AHA Releases Effectiveness-Based Guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women—2011 Update

The American Heart Association released an update to their guidelines for CVD prevention in women.  The 2011 guidelines provide a greater focus on keeping patients healthy, rather than treating disease.  Changes in the guidelines include:

  • New recommendation of “pregnancy as a stress test.”  See The Wall Street Journal article, “Problems in Pregnancy Signal Future Health Risks.”
  • Low risk patients are categorized as “Optimum Health”
  • New geriatrics section
  • New lupus as a CVD co-morbidity, focus on CVD prevention in lupus patients
  • New recommendation of supplemental fish oils for high risk women
  • High dose aspirin risk benefit analysis for high risk women
  • Greater emphasis on cultural diversity and sensitivity

View and print the 2011 Guidelines from Circulation here.

View and print the 2011 Guidelines Summary here.

View The Heart Truth Professional Education Slideshows

The Heart Truth Professional Education One-Hour Presentations:

Beginner Evidence-Based Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Women 

Intermediate Evidence-Based Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Women

Advanced Evidence Based Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Women

The Heart Truth Professional Education Modules:

Behavioral Aspects for CVD Prevention in Women Module

Diagnosis CVD in Women Module

Epidemiology CVD in Women Module

Evidence-Based Guidelines CVD in Women Module

HRT Update CVD in Women Module

Presentation Resources and Internet Resources CVD in Women Module

Prognosis and Treatment Outcomes CVD in Women Module

Risk Assessment Tool CVD in Women Module

Risk Factors CVD in Women Module

News Release: Evaluation of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Guidelines for Women

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, Journal of the American Heart Association published a review of the 2007 update to the AHA guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention in women by assigning  161,808 Women’s Health Initiative participants ages 50 to 79 to risk categories as perscribed in the guidelines, and then analyzed clinical event rates within and between strata.

  • AHA guidelines predicted coronary events with accuracy similar to current Framingham risk categories
  • AHA guidelines predicted coronary events less well than proposed Framingham10-year risk categories of less than 5%, 5% to 20%, and more than 20%
  • Risk stratification as proposed in the 2007 AHA guideline is simple, accessible to patients and providers, and identifies cardiovascular risk with accuracy similar to that of the current Framingham algorithm

Click here to read the full article.

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